The Three Billy-Goats Gruff

The Three Goats

Once upon a time, there were three billy-goats. They were to go up to the hillside to make themselves fat. The name of all three was “Gruff.”

On the way up was a bridge over a stream they had to cross. Under the bridge lived a great ugly Troll, with eyes as big as saucers and a nose as long as a poker.

So, first of all, came the youngest billy-goat Gruff to cross the bridge.

“Trip, trap! trip, trap!” went the bridge.

“Who’s that tripping over my bridge?” roared the Troll.

“Oh, it is only I, the tiniest billy-goat Gruff; and I’m going up to the hillside to make myself fat,” said the billy-goat, with such a small voice.

“Now I’m coming to gobble you up,” said the Troll.

“Oh, no! Don’t take me. I’m too little that I am,” said the billy-goat; “Wait a bit till the second billy-goat Gruff comes; he’s much bigger.”

“Well, be off with you,” said the Troll.

A little while later came the second billy-goat Gruff to cross the bridge.

“Trip, Trap! Trip, Trap! Trip, Trap!” went the bridge.

“WHO’S THAT tripping over my bridge?” roared the Troll.

“Oh, it’s the second billy-goat Gruff, and I’m going up to the hillside to make myself fat,” said the billy-goat, who hadn’t such a small voice.

“Now I’m coming to gobble you up,” said the Troll.

“Oh, no! Don’t take me. Wait for a little till the big billy-goat Gruff comes; he’s much bigger.”

“Very well! Be off with you,” said the Troll.

But just then up came the big billy-goat Gruff.

“TRIP, TRAP! TRIP, TRAP! TRIP, TRAP!” went the bridge, for the billy-goat was so heavy that the bridge creaked and groaned under him.

“WHO’S THAT tramping over my bridge?” roared the Troll.

“IT’S I! THE BIG BILLY-GOAT GRUFF,” said the billy-goat, who had an ugly hoarse voice of his own.

“NOW I’M COMING TO GOBBLE YOU UP,” roared the Troll.

“WELL, COME ALONG!” the big billy-goat said, and so he flew at the Troll and tossed him out into the stream, and after that, he went up to the hillside. There the billy-goats got so fat they were scarcely able to walk home again; and if the fat hasn’t fallen off them, they’re still fat; and so –

“Snip, snap, snout.

This tale’s told out.”